Best Online Portal for Instagram | Contact | Privacy Policy

Photos, videos and stories from instagram posts tagged with #seedtofork

Images, videos and stories tagged with #seedtofork

There’s something about being on the farm, I’m not sure if it’s the early morning steam rising off the hill side, the earthy smell of the organic soil, the familiar bark of Mrs Liew’s orders or just the bright smiles of our farmers. It just makes you feel…
There’s something about being on the farm, I’m not sure if it’s the early morning steam rising off the hill side, the earthy smell of the organic soil, the familiar bark of Mrs Liew’s orders or just the bright smiles of our farmers. It just makes you feel damn good to be there. This guy agrees, do you? 🌱 #farmfriends #farmlife #thegoodlife #organic #organicfood #organicproduce #farmtotable #seedtofork #farmfresh #sustainablesingapore #sustainabledining #sustainabletravel #sustainablechef #slowfood #sgfoodies #klfoodie #weedsandmore
Yesterday’s afternoon harvest. No time to arrange it in the rainbow it surely is, but managed to document it before it all got tucked away. All those months of drabness are always worth weeks upon weeks of this vibrant produce. What do you do with those rogue…
Yesterday’s afternoon harvest. No time to arrange it in the rainbow it surely is, but managed to document it before it all got tucked away. All those months of drabness are always worth weeks upon weeks of this vibrant produce. What do you do with those rogue summer squash? Don’t tell me you never let one slip away, because that’s nonsense. It happens to all of us. This is the second one in as many weeks to sneak away from me; granted I was distracted last week, but this one may be close to a record. And that’s not a boast-worthy record, in case you’re wondering. Two things are fascinating about this plant though: 1. It’s growing happily outside the deer fence, and hence the runaway fruit as I forget to check for them; 2. It has very few male flowers yet every single female flower has matured into viable fruit. Thank you, happy pollinators, who are traveling the garden all day to ensure I will be fed, too. Last year this same variety, Costata romanesco, grew leaves 3 feet square, so I kicked it out of the veggie patch this summer because it was just too big and unruly. Now it’s behaving itself in every way possible, just to gain a spot back in the main garden next year. And it’s working. Inside the veggie garden I ripped out my patty pan because it’s been producing 90% male flowers all summer and very few fruits; as fun as they are to grow, I’m done with that variety for now. Sowing more radishes there today. Other noteworthy veggies are those picture-perfect foot-long Purple haze carrots, my first Hatch red chilies, a dozen Gochu peppers, an orange Gourmet bell pepper, velour (purple) bush beans, cucumbers - all the cucumbers, and a large enough quantity of cucamelons to begin my first dilly cucamelon lacto-ferment. Hands down the fastest way to preserve food is using a salt water brine, letting nature take care of it, so that will be a task I can definitely manage today, along with another batch of sweet relish and one more round of canned dill pickles. Giving the tomatoes a few days to get back to critical mass before I start roasting and processing them again. Here’s to a wonderful Wednesday!
I forced myself to seek out other areas of the garden yesterday, places where other edibles were maturing, too, like our second succession of cabbage that continues to feed us delicious summer meals. Don’t worry tomatoes, you’re still my first and most passionate…
I forced myself to seek out other areas of the garden yesterday, places where other edibles were maturing, too, like our second succession of cabbage that continues to feed us delicious summer meals. Don’t worry tomatoes, you’re still my first and most passionate love this summer. This 4 lb savoy cabbage has been begging for my attention and I’ve been pushing it to its limit - thankfully, it didn’t split open before I harvested it. I finally set my eyes - and this week’s menu - on this magnificent sight. It might be the largest savoy I’ve ever grown. This variety is called Famosa and we’ve been growing it successfully as an early spring and main summer cabbage for the past 3 years here. I plant 2 or 3 successions of it, first two in late winter/early Spring, and the third in mid-June. I am a huge cabbage fanatic, but when eating cabbage raw savoy is my number one choice with its tender, wrinkly leaves just waiting to be slathered in a dressing. I love the fact that we can harvest cabbage one day and summer squash, green beans, cucumbers, and tomatoes the next. Well, if I don’t harvest those other crops tomorrow, I will literally have even bigger problems the following day. The other beautiful and noteworthy thing here is my massing of Benary’s Giant zinnia. They are prolific and tall and very happy at the edge of our patio. A lot of people say they remind them of dahlias, and that’s great because I tried dahlias once and they are just not for me. I need my flowers to be independent and low maintenance to gain a place in our garden, and zinnias are all that and more: drought and heat tolerant, relatively pest and disease resistant, long vase life as cut flowers, and the bees, butterflies, and humans alike all admire and benefit from their beauty daily. I am growing individual colors from the Benary’s series, and both these seeds, not surprisingly, were sourced from one of my favorite, most reliable seed companies, @johnnys_seeds
A very quick harvest to get the day going. This weekend will be dedicated to making tomato sauce, pesto + drying chilli peppers.
A very quick harvest to get the day going. This weekend will be dedicated to making tomato sauce, pesto + drying chilli peppers.
We love the peaceful evenings at our farm on the Colorado High Prairie! And we love sharing this view with visitors to our farm who appreciate the work we do, and the beauty at the end of the day. We created Rollinghomestays.com to make it easier for farms,…
We love the peaceful evenings at our farm on the Colorado High Prairie! And we love sharing this view with visitors to our farm who appreciate the work we do, and the beauty at the end of the day. We created Rollinghomestays.com to make it easier for farms, ranches, orchards, vineyards, and other producers, to share our beautiful lifestyle through Agritourism experiences! Are you interested in Agritourism? We are offering the first 100 farms to complete our very short survey a coupon code for 100% off your first year's membership, with no obligation! Join the growing community of Agritourism Destinations! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/N9388R6 #rollinghomestays #agritourism #rvlifestyle #agriculture #rvlife #farmshostrvers #farmadventures #farmtotable #permaculture #farm #ranch #vineyard #orchard #tourism #brewery #mead #winery #farmfresh #apiary #surveymonkey #farmsurvey #freemembership #sustainableagriculture #loveyourfarmer #homeiswhereyouparkit #boondocking #boondockinglife #seedtofork #homestead #coloradoproud
If I told you I’m tired of arranging tomatoes for photographs, would you believe me? I feel as if this is getting a bit, well, repetitive and myopic, but as it is one of the primary and most photogenic foods I’m hauling out of the food garden right now, I…
If I told you I’m tired of arranging tomatoes for photographs, would you believe me? I feel as if this is getting a bit, well, repetitive and myopic, but as it is one of the primary and most photogenic foods I’m hauling out of the food garden right now, I might as well keep to my promise of my feed being reflective of what is in season at the moment. And, despite disease pressure, the tomatoes seem to be doing okay I’d say. This was harvested last night, 13.5 lbs of tomatoes, and all those paste and plum tomatoes have already been oven roasted. I am truly beginning to understand why some of you grow over 50 tomato plants. I still think you’re absolutely nuts, by the way, but do concede that it makes sense on many levels. It takes a lot of tomatoes to make a decent batch of canned salsa. And by a lot, I mean at least 15 lbs. Despite having doubled our tomato garden, I am all but certain we have not grown enough to be self-sufficient for the year, but you better believe I’m gonna see just how many jars of salsa and canned tomatoes I can tuck away before our first fall frost. Meanwhile, the monarchs have found our meadow blazing star and that has already started to spam my Stories. You’re welcome. It’s my absolute favorite time of summer, so much joy in the garden with dozens fluttering about and around me. I find myself so flooded with emotion this time of year as we are hitting our crescendo, overcome with sheer joy it bring me to tears of bittersweet gratitude: all that we’ve dreamed and hoped and worked so hard for is here. And before we are ready, it will also be gone. So there’s only one logical solution. Enjoy your today, friends.
Wedding season is upon us! Have you booked your rehearsal dinner yet? We have the perfect space for you! Give us a call today for more details ☎️ 🌊 🌊 🌊 🌊 🌊 Have you bought your tickets for #HudsonValleys Culinary Event of the Year, @chefsforclearwater? Visit…
These cucumbers keep on coming... this is number 9 and at least 3 more are growing. . I’ve not grown them before but they’ll be a regular from now on! . . . #cucumber #cucumberplant #cucumber🥒 #blackheath #kidbrooke #allotment #garden #flower #veggiegrower…
Beauty in the garden is found in every place, from the perfect blossoms of your favorite flowers to stunning insects - friend or foe alike - to the irregular cracking in a tomato such as this one. For me an imperfect garden, meaning each one of our gardens,…
Beauty in the garden is found in every place, from the perfect blossoms of your favorite flowers to stunning insects - friend or foe alike - to the irregular cracking in a tomato such as this one. For me an imperfect garden, meaning each one of our gardens, has a deeper story to tell, just like each of us. Take this solar flare. This tomato all but died back, along with a handful of other tomato plants, in an unpredicted late frost that took me by surprise this Spring. I trimmed it back and left it to rebound, the only one I didn’t replace solely because I didn’t have a Solar Flare backup. It was knocked back at least a month with all the dieback, but here it is, complete with this imperfect fruit that I find so endearing. Lucky for me, it doesn’t seem to be impacted by the Anthracnose plague that my other large tomatoes are exhibiting. Despite or perhaps knowing what real tomatoes look like, I cringe when I see ‘perfect’ tomatoes lined up in the grocery store any and every single day of the year. I prefer my tomatoes real, and that means cracking, catfacing, splitting, and all. I suppose, yes, even battling disease, too. Because that’s my reality, and that is what fresh, homegrown, organic tomatoes look like. They remind me of my favorite people, those whose paths and stories are deep and wandering, whose hearts have been shattered a million ways yet are here to grace this world with their fierce spirits. It’s not the perfection I’m after in my garden, or in life for that matter, because that’s a fallacy. It’s the grit, the true beauty that I seek and embrace because that’s where life sings its sweetest melody to those whose hearts are listening for it.
Goodmorning everyone just a quick reminder we offer the majority of our greens in 5x5 or personal sizes in living options either at a just germinated and fully grown stage. If anyone wants one either during delivery days or farmers market please just drop…
Goodmorning everyone just a quick reminder we offer the majority of our greens in 5x5" or personal sizes in living options either at a "just germinated" and fully grown stage. If anyone wants one either during delivery days or farmers market please just drop us a line. Prices range from $3 for wheat/ barley grasses up to $5 for the exotics most greens are $4 per small tray. For these awesome living options we encourage pre orders and if possible please recycle the container back to us. Thanks for your support and help. #familyowned #local #beyondorganic #living #microgreens #specialtyproduce #farmtotable #seedtofork #frontrange #coloradosprings #pueblo
My favorite season, tomato season! Just did a quick pick in walapini as I was watering before it gets 100* in there today. Absolutely can not wait to get a bunch more to make my homemade salsa 🍅 #freshtomatoes🍅 #organic #harvestseason #startedfromseed #seedtofork…
Have you been wanting to get into agritourism, but you just arent quite sure about where to jump in? Let us help! Rollinghomestays.com is an Agritourism Destination Directory Website that was created BY farmers FOR farmers! RollingHomeStays connects farms,…
Have you been wanting to get into agritourism, but you just aren't quite sure about where to jump in? Let us help! Rollinghomestays.com is an Agritourism Destination Directory Website that was created BY farmers FOR farmers! RollingHomeStays connects farms, ranches, vineyards, breweries and more with travelers interested in supporting local agriculture wherever they go! You can receive a coupon code for 100% off your first year's membership by answering a very short survey! With absolutely no obligation to you! It's a pretty good deal for answering 5 short questions! Thank you for taking our survey! Your feedback helps us support the Agritourism community! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/N9388R6 #loveyourfarmer #farmadventures #farmtotable #rvlife #farmshostrvers #surveymonkey #sustainableagriculture #permaculturedesign #permaculture #seedtofork #rvlifestyle #travel #touristfarm #tourism #farmfresh #eatlocal #agritourism #rollinghomestays #farms #ranches #vineyards #brewery #localagriculture
It’s time for more introductions now that everybody is ripe. Swipe to see all our tomato varieties labeled. I’m gonna be honest: I didn’t know how many different varieties there were until I arranged them here. I knew the total count and my goal of putting…
It’s time for more introductions now that everybody is ripe. Swipe to see all our tomato varieties labeled. I’m gonna be honest: I didn’t know how many different varieties there were until I arranged them here. I knew the total count and my goal of putting up tomatoes for winter eating, but that’s about it. And, I had visions of a colorful rainbow of tomatoes, but as you can see mine is dominated by red and lacking any green types. Trust me, it’s been noted for next year. So, it’s gonna take me 3 or more years to achieve a rainbow of tomatoes. That’s a lot of waiting, and a reminder that good things and visions don’t happen overnight. I’m perfectly content with what I have this year. It’s also possibly just how I lean, and that’s knowledge gained, too. I chose to add several simple red tomatoes this year, perhaps because they are nostalgic for me, a simple tomato from simpler times - at least that’s how I recall my childhood. But I caution you not to think it’s all rainbows and tomato glory for me, because several of these tomatoes have developed Anthracnose and sneaky me isn’t showing those sides of the tomatoes. This post isn’t about how awesome and perfect my tomatoes are. Because they’re not. It’s simply a visual guide for both of us, disease aside. You never know what surprises the garden will thrust upon you, and that is probably one of my favorite things. No, I’m not happy to have to deal with a persistent fungal disease in my soil for the next four years, unsure of its origins and if crop rotation will be successful or not. But I definitely love the unpredictability of every growing season, especially when presented with learning first hand about new pests and diseases. I’m a perpetual student, and a complete junkie for the garden classroom.
Day 2 @pvschoolgardens Jr. Chefs made their own Fruit Nachos for morning snack! Cinnamon sugar caramelized on baked chips with heaps of yogurt and fresh fruit to launch our fiesta themed day! gARTen to Kitchen Camp @pvartcenter #edibleeducation #culinarycamp…
2 things I must eat every summer...Lobstah rolls 🦞 (New England girl here!), and fresh garden tomatoes for salads! This fresh tomatoe cucumber salad is so simple, yet so delicious!! All you need is a cuke, a tomato, a little bit of onion, ground sea salt,…
It’s a beautiful Saturday at @miltons_cuisine the garden is blooming with bountiful delights! Look at the beautiful okra flowering. It will be on your plate soon! See y’all tonight. #localfoodmovement #seedtofork #atlantaeats #farmhouse #chefderekdollar #awesomealpharetta…
If you had told me when I created this account two years ago to share our gardening passion with you all - instead of spamming my non-gardening friends - that it would lead to becoming friends with the likes of this well-known organic gardening expert, I…
If you had told me when I created this account two years ago to share our gardening passion with you all - instead of spamming my non-gardening friends - that it would lead to becoming friends with the likes of this well-known organic gardening expert, I would have laughed you off. Truly. In this day and age of 24/7 technology and endless scrolling, it can be both a blessing and a curse: at its worst, you constantly compare yourself to others feeling less than, which is complete nonsense, by the way, and at its best you get to meet some of the most influential garden gurus around and develop new friendships not possible without this palm-sized computer app we all can’t live without. Case in point, this past week Joe Lamp’l visited our garden to film an episode for Season 10 of Growing A Greener World, a PBS gardening show. If you don’t already follow him ( @joegardener), please take a moment to follow and support what he does: he’s also on You Tube, hosts a weekly podcast, and has online gardening courses. Being a part of making a single episode of a TV show, something that has never been a remote goal of mine, brought to light how much love and energy and grit gets poured into every second that makes the final cut of any show. Making gardening TV means I didn’t actually garden much this past week, despite having spent almost every waking minute in the garden. And this guy does it all the time - he has a beautiful, productive organic home garden just outside Atlanta which is also the set for his TV show. I now fully appreciate how much work that is to accomplish, to be an actual gardener while also being in front of a camera most of the time. He’s as passionate as they get about growing organic food and helping others be successful, and he’s also a genuinely wonderful human; it is an honor to count him as a friend, all thanks to our crazy love of growing food. I am still a little shocked and perhaps in disbelief that he wanted to feature my garden. At least I have this garden selfie taken minutes before he raced to catch his flight home as photographic evidence; I’ll need it to remind me that it all wasn’t some surreal daydream. Thank you, Joe!
My little supervisor Ernie watching very intently as I fill watering can. Maybe next year well get the drip lines, but for now I hand water hundreds & hundreds of plants in both the greenhouse, walapini & gardens (when we dont get rain for long periods).…
My little supervisor Ernie watching very intently as I fill watering can. Maybe next year we'll get the drip lines, but for now I hand water hundreds & hundreds of plants in both the greenhouse, walapini & gardens (when we don't get rain for long periods). It's exhausting, but gotta do what ya gotta do to have fresh organic food right? #mysupervisor #ernie #nigeriandwarfgoat #nigeriandwarfbuckling #sosweet #lovethoseeyes #blueeyes #wateringcan #exhausting #worthit #organic #garden #walapini #greenhouse #freshveggies #seedtofork #farmtotable #tomarkettomarket #homesteadinglife #homesteading #farmher #feedingmyfamily
Are you looking for a showstopping venue and a delicious farm to table menu? Look no further than our Lodge! Give us a call to hear more ☎️ 🌊 🌊 🌊 🌊 🌊 Have you ordered your tickets for #HudsonValleys Culinary Event of the Year, @chefsforclearwater? Tickets…
The first bit of orange shining like a beacon in an otherwise very green greenhouse! Are all tomatoes late this year? #seedtofork #growyourownfood #greenhouse #homegrownfood #veggiesrock #gardenersofinstagram #allotmentsofinstagram
Everytime I spot a new fruit or veggie in the garden I am like a gitty little teen, excited for their first dance! #cantaloupe #farmtotable #seedtofork #hobbyfarm #ilovethisstuff #melonfordays #shaworegon #shawhillhomestead #garden #melon
Pulled a flavorful rainbow out of the garden yesterday afternoon, dominated by tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers. This summer has not yielded the crazy abundance of green beans and summer squash of years past, and instead of being an overwhelming glut, we…
Pulled a flavorful rainbow out of the garden yesterday afternoon, dominated by tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers. This summer has not yielded the crazy abundance of green beans and summer squash of years past, and instead of being an overwhelming glut, we are managing to consume most of it at the rate of maturity. It’s not often that the garden produces just right; it’s usually a flop or an inundation, but with green beans, cucumbers, and summer squash it’s more often the glut that prevails. Another bumper crop this month has been the Leutschauer paprika peppers, which can be seen at the top of the photo with a few other pepper varieties tossed in there, too. Growing my own paprika powder was one of my most exciting new twists this year, focusing for the first time on growing my own spices. It turns out I’m growing two sweet and one hot paprika, and Leutschauer is the hot one. It’s very prolific and hotter than I expected it to be. These are the things you learn first hand when you grow your own food, and I much prefer to have gained this knowledge by selecting the seed, sowing them between snowstorms in February, potting them up while I impatiently waited for Spring, and then carefully planting them out and watching them grow, waiting until that first ripe red fruit before I experienced the flavor for the first time. It’s a beautiful relationship you embark on when you grow from seed, committing to a food, sometimes taking a chance on someone new while other times - many times for me - returning to your favorite, dependable friend. I love how the garden helps me slow down in an otherwise noisy and frenetic pace of life, allowing me to spend more than half a year curious and excited for something like a new pepper to waltz into our kitchen and onto our plates.
Oh hey there, cantaloupe. I’ve always loved to grow vertically, and when space was limited, it was out of sheer necessity. Presently, we choose to grow vertically for added growing space despite this extra large garden. It also happens to be a great way to…
Oh hey there, cantaloupe. I’ve always loved to grow vertically, and when space was limited, it was out of sheer necessity. Presently, we choose to grow vertically for added growing space despite this extra large garden. It also happens to be a great way to maximize air flow around vining crops as well as adding beautiful spikes of architectural interest to the garden - not to mention how much easier it is to harvest when the produce is up off the ground. Growing cantaloupes on a trellis is one of my favorite things to spy come mid-August. These are plugging along in the northeast corner of our orchard, partially ignored because they are about the farthest thing from the hose so rarely get supplemental irrigation. With a little luck, we‘ll be eating a few melons by the end of August, before school starts, but they largely come into season in early September, around the same time the earliest leaves start dropping from our ash trees. The fallen leaves harmoniously blend with the color of the ripe cantaloupe, and it’s as if the cantaloupe in return echoes that same yielding back to a quieter time, beginning that downward trend toward our long slumber. I tend to mentally lump this in as a fall crop because of when it matures for me here. It’s hard to believe we are turning that corner toward the end of summer; I am intimately aware of what that means for my days in the garden, but at least we’ve got ripe cantaloupes on the horizon to add to our abundance and usher in one of the most beautiful seasons of the year. I am soaking up these late summer garden days, watching monarchs build in number and the meadow blazing star begin to flower, savoring these final weeks of summer heat. We’ve got a lot left to celebrate here before we transition to cooler fall days, and watching these swell and ripen reminds me just how sweet and delicious an August garden is.
NOTE TO SELF: Get a step stool for the garden🤷🏻‍♀️👩🏻‍🌾Vertical gardening ... trellising ... whatever you wanna call it....just know is the most successful method of saving space while growing quality cucumbers! The green apple cucumber seeds from @bakercreekseeds…
NOTE TO SELF: Get a step stool for the garden🤷🏻‍♀️👩🏻‍🌾Vertical gardening ... trellising ... whatever you wanna call it....just know is the most successful method of saving space while growing quality cucumbers! The green apple cucumber seeds from @bakercreekseeds are so prolific! #savingseeds #harvest #freefood #cucumbers #cukes #fresh #zucchini #veggies #greenhousegardening #squash #summerveggies #greenvegetables #gardening #squash #instagarden #gardening #greenhouseseeds #seedtofork #dirttoplate #instagarden #gardenaddicts #secretgardens #veggies # #ijustplantstuff
Are you a lobster lover? Well you must not miss out on this years Lobster Madness dinner at Miltons Cuisine & Cocktails. On September 29th you will be wined and dined with a cocktail garden reception with passed hors doeuvres and bubbly, followed by a…
Are you a lobster lover? Well you must not miss out on this year's Lobster Madness dinner at Milton's Cuisine & Cocktails. On September 29th you will be wined and dined with a cocktail garden reception with passed hors d'oeuvres and bubbly, followed by a five-course Lobster dinner with wine pairings. Tickets are still available at $150 each and can be purchased on the website! www.miltonscuisine.com
What better way to celebrate the veggies that trickle in before the big harvests begin than salad rolls containing a little bit of evvvvverything? 🤤
What better way to celebrate the veggies that trickle in before the big harvests begin than salad rolls containing a little bit of evvvvverything? 🤤
Went out to the garden to look and came back with peppers. They are bell, jalapeños, and chili peppers. What’s your favorite part about gardening? I love harvesting peppers. #peppers #allgardensgrow #garden #gardentime #gardenfun #pepper #pepperfun #gardening…
Sorry I’ve not been posting much this summer! . I’ve been working hard on giving my craft room a much needed makeover and turning it back into a school room. And I need to get it done before school starts! . Oh, and there’s the garden harvest too! Cherry…
Sorry I’ve not been posting much this summer! . I’ve been working hard on giving my craft room a much needed makeover and turning it back into a school room. And I need to get it done before school starts! . Oh, and there’s the garden harvest too! Cherry tomatoes are coming in like crazy now! Guess I’ll be making Cherry Tomato Pasta today for supper!! 😋 . . . #tomatoes #cherrytomatoes #garden #gardenproduce #organic #organicgardener #vegetablegarden #kitchengarden #seedtofork #herbs #basil #oregano #yummy #food
I love everything I grow but nothin’ beats garden fresh tomatoes man... 😍🤤 . . . #garden #gardening #vegetablegarden #vegetablegardening #tomato #happygardener #healthyplants #happyplants #zone7 #zone7a #seedtofork #seedtotable #backyardgarden #backyardveggies…
Seabass Dynamite #oceantotable #seedtofork #farmtotable #808
Little bits of the tomato patch, shining a bright light on what is a dark shadow lingering in my tomato garden. Here among many beauties is my first solar flare who split; I wanted to bring it in before the rains return tonight. Those black beauties are from…
Little bits of the tomato patch, shining a bright light on what is a dark shadow lingering in my tomato garden. Here among many beauties is my first solar flare who split; I wanted to bring it in before the rains return tonight. Those black beauties are from a different plant growing far away from the infected one. Will they develop Anthracnose, too? I’m keeping my eye on them, and everyone, but so far it seems to be hitting primarily my Black Beauties and Costuloto Genovese hardest. My strategy with the tomatoes is utter caution - and extreme hygiene. If you caught my post over the weekend, you know I found Anthracnose developing on some of my fruit ripening indoors. This means it infected my fruit in the garden. It’s a tricky fungal pathogen who can have infected fruit - even green fruit - and not show signs for almost a week until ripening. So, I’ve taken to harvesting my larger tomatoes — the ones that seem most susceptible to this tomato terror — on the early side, several days earlier than normal. I’m also roasting them, too, and if I see any sunken areas but no sign of spores, I generously cut those out and dispose of them in the trash, roasting what is left. If the tomatoes are farther gone, I am throwing the entire fruit away in my garbage; I am not composting any of the blemished fruit on site, and I will be removing every last tomato and tomato stem, leaf, and root from this bed come fall and disposing them in our trash, also. The smaller tomatoes do not seem to be impacted. Time on the vine is definitely a contributing factor to who seems to be developing this fruit rot. Thankfully, my Juliets and cherries all seem immune, for the moment. So I’m harvesting, roasting, and making more salsa this week, salvaging any and every tomato I safely can, tucking them away for long term enjoyment. Hoping this next version yields a recipe worthy of my website’s Recipe section (coming soon).
Growing sweetcorn has been a first for us this year and oh have we enjoyed it! We’ve seen quite mixed opinions of growing sweetcorn but then you can apply the same about most things in the garden! All part of life’s lessons. We grew these from seed indoors…
Growing sweetcorn has been a first for us this year and oh have we enjoyed it! We’ve seen quite mixed opinions of growing sweetcorn but then you can apply the same about most things in the garden! All part of life’s lessons. We grew these from seed indoors in early May and planted out after the last frost, they had grown quite a bit by that point because the frosts just seemed to keep on coming. Luckily, it warmed up quite quickly. It’s been amazing watching them grow and their strength is incredible. Even with the latest winds, I had expected it to flatten them - but no! Still standing. We had good fun harvesting a couple at the weekend and cooked them in the oven with butter. I’ve not seen food fly off the plate so quickly! Luckily we have plenty more to eat and will be enjoying them over the coming weeks. We’ll also be trying out a sweetcorn stir fry (who knew) recipe from @jamieoliver which we can almost cook entirely from our garden produce! #gyo #sweetcorn #gardenersofinstagram #gardners #growwhatyoueat #organic #seedtotable #seedtofork #vegetables #vegetablegardening #growyourown #sustainablelifestyle #homesteading #gardeningwithchildren #kidsgarden #kidsdogardening
Meet Cole Pate, Executive Chef of Milton’s, located in the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain, NC. Cole shares his love of food, a little about Western North Carolina, and where he sources the ingredients for this seed to fork concept. Stop by for dinner…
Meet Cole Pate, Executive Chef of Milton’s, located in the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain, NC. Cole shares his love of food, a little about Western North Carolina, and where he sources the ingredients for this seed to fork concept. Stop by for dinner Wednesday through Saturday or Sunday Brunch and try Cole’s new Summer menu featuring fresh local ingredients such as summer squash, heirloom tomatoes, sweet corn, and shishito peppers.
Meet Cole Pate, Executive Chef of Milton’s, located in the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain, NC. Cole shares his love of food, a little about Western North Carolina, and where he sources the ingredients for this seed to fork concept. Stop by for dinner…
Meet Cole Pate, Executive Chef of Milton’s, located in the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain, NC. Cole shares his love of food, a little about Western North Carolina, and where he sources the ingredients for this seed to fork concept. Stop by for dinner Wednesday through Saturday or Sunday Brunch and try Cole’s new Summer menu featuring fresh local ingredients such as summer squash, heirloom tomatoes, sweet corn, and shishito peppers.
It takes most of the growing season for this 7.5’ tall arbor to fill in, and we are almost there. With the cold June I had tempered my hopes of a full arch until September. We built this last spring as my Mother’s Day gift, complete with an I-almost-peed-my-pants…
It takes most of the growing season for this 7.5’ tall arbor to fill in, and we are almost there. With the cold June I had tempered my hopes of a full arch until September. We built this last spring as my Mother’s Day gift, complete with an I-almost-peed-my-pants laughing hysterically while (husband and wife) installing the darn thing. There were tears, too, mostly joyful at the ludicrousness of our installation approach. I digress, but I’m about to cry-laugh just remembering it. The winners this summer filling out the arbor include the Armenian cucumber and trailing nasturtiums, both climbing to heights well exceeding my highest expectations - and both thriving on the western (right) side. There are also scarlet runners, though they are quiet at the moment, recuperating from July’s brutal heat; I expect they’ll make a comeback soon, delighting the hummingbirds before they depart for the Winter. Lastly, cucamelons and Persian cucumbers are thriving and producing well, too, and not to he overlooked. The cucamelons chug along, nonplussed by the increasing competition for sunlight. I have to prune the cucumbers and nasturtiums occasionally to keep the suckers in check, especially those that want to sprawl west into that triangle bed that’s now planted with fall crops. Despite the garden having troubles here and there as happens annually in any and every garden, this view smacks me in the face every time I open the gate, showering me with hope and positivity. It reminds me to see the bigger picture, which, all in all, looks rather beautiful at the moment, particularly from this angle. If you’re having challenges in your garden, remember to find that angle to remind yourself there’s beauty in it all, despite, and probably more so because of, the challenges.
Sunday harvest. Small onions, small beets, patty pan squash, the last radishes, early tomatoes and plenty more greens. We are not impressed with the crop, but it’s home grown and feels good! #veggiegarden #seedtotable #seedtofork #goodsoil #eatfromtheearth
Avocado Toast - honey wheat bread, sunny side farm eggs, julienne radish, creamy lemon dressing, pickled fresno chilies, garden greens. Available every Sunday at Brunch - book your table now (link in bio)!⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ #miltons #seedtofork #farmtotable #alpharettabrunch…
Happy Sunday! Join us on the patio for a round of Bloody Marys and a good ol southern brunch. Pictured here: Pimento Cheese Benedict with poached eggs, english muffins, hollandaise, garden greens, and your choice of creamy grits or brunch potatoes.⁠ .⁠ .⁠…
Happy Sunday! Join us on the patio for a round of Bloody Marys and a good ol' southern brunch. Pictured here: Pimento Cheese Benedict with poached eggs, english muffins, hollandaise, garden greens, and your choice of creamy grits or brunch potatoes.⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ #miltonsblackmountain #themontevistahotel #southernfood #chefsofasheville #wnc #dinewnc #farmtotable #seedtofork #comfortfood #blackmountain #blackmountainnc #asheville #ashevillenc #dineasheville #southernbrunch #pimentocheese #pimentobendict #blackmountainbrunch #brunchasheville
Happy Sunday! Join us on the patio for a round of Bloody Marys and a good ol southern brunch. Pictured here: Pimento Cheese Benedict with poached eggs, english muffins, hollandaise, garden greens, and your choice of creamy grits or brunch potatoes.⁠ .⁠ .⁠…
Happy Sunday! Join us on the patio for a round of Bloody Marys and a good ol' southern brunch. Pictured here: Pimento Cheese Benedict with poached eggs, english muffins, hollandaise, garden greens, and your choice of creamy grits or brunch potatoes.⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ #miltonsblackmountain #themontevistahotel #southernfood #chefsofasheville #wnc #dinewnc #farmtotable #seedtofork #comfortfood #blackmountain #blackmountainnc #asheville #ashevillenc #dineasheville #southernbrunch #pimentocheese #pimentobendict #blackmountainbrunch #brunchasheville
Never had tomatoes so heavy they broke their cages 😍 So ready for these Cherokee purples to ripen 🤤 #tomato #cherokeepurple #growyourown #giants #lovewhayyoudo #seedtofork
Finally pulled all of my beets, half went towards these beautiful beet chips and the rest went into the dehydrator. The crazy mutant beet will be dried and turned into a powder I can use for food coloring along with all the other bits and ends 🌱 This cooler…
We finally have all of our cucumber varieties ripe at the same time and I wanted to share them with you. Clockwise from top left we have lemon, slicing, Persian, cucamelon, Armenian, and pickling. And yes, the quantities are somewhat reflective of their respective…
We finally have all of our cucumber varieties ripe at the same time and I wanted to share them with you. Clockwise from top left we have lemon, slicing, Persian, cucamelon, Armenian, and pickling. And yes, the quantities are somewhat reflective of their respective productivity. It only took half the summer to have them harmoniously producing, but it was well worth the wait. I’ve been waiting on that Armenian cucumber in the bottom left the longest. Swipe to see them sliced open and labeled; thank the rainy Saturday for this kind of attention to detail in the height of harvest time. I’m having way too much fun playing with my food today, taking the garden with me wherever I go. Typically, I end up in the kitchen processing it, so this was a welcome diversion. And honestly, my world of cucumbers blew wide open this summer, with all three new varieties being less bitter and sweeter than our normal slicers. And while I’ll always grow slicing cucumbers because they are my youngest’s favorite food, I’ll pass them over for a Persian, Armenian, or Lemon cucumber every single time now. Holy cow - bitterless cucumbers. Yes please. How did I not know this was a thing? I’m so smitten with the flavor and texture of all these new varieties. Three new favorites; that’s a record breaking experiment as it’s not usually that easy to secure an open invitation to my established veggie patch and its beloved and proven roster. But trying new seeds each year is truly a joy from the selecting to the planning to of course, the anticipation. I highly recommend it because until you grow it and taste it from your own garden, you won’t know if it’s for you. And yeah, there might be some homegrown magic going on when I try something I grew from seed for the very first time, and I am in more than good with that. Do you think we are good, or are there more cucumber varieties waiting for us to try next year?
Beat the heat with a refreshing Milton Mule. We make it with Bare Bone Vodka, peach pickle brine, lime juice, ginger beer, basil, and pickled peaches. A perfect libation for a southern summer day!⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ #miltons #chefderekdollar #mule #summercocktails…
Start your meal off with an order of these little devils tonight... Deviled Farm Eggs with Bentons Bacon, garden herb aioli, and pickled shallot. ⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ #miltonsblackmountain #themontevistahotel #southernfood #chefsofasheville #wnc #dinewnc #farmtotable…
Start your meal off with an order of these little devils tonight... Deviled Farm Eggs with Bentons Bacon, garden herb aioli, and pickled shallot. ⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ #miltonsblackmountain #themontevistahotel #southernfood #chefsofasheville #wnc #dinewnc #farmtotable…
Just not pretty enough? In rich countries, around 40% of food losses occur on the supermarket shelves and in consumer’s kitchens. In supermarkets, most of this is because veg are too small, too big or don’t observe our ideas of what a vegetable should look…
Trouble in tomato paradise, and it’s name is Anthracnose. It took me a few decades to meet this unwelcome guest, though experiential knowledge aside, I would have been perfectly content never having met it. Don’t be fooled by the gorgeous, dark shoulders…
Trouble in tomato paradise, and it’s name is Anthracnose. It took me a few decades to meet this unwelcome guest, though experiential knowledge aside, I would have been perfectly content never having met it. Don’t be fooled by the gorgeous, dark shoulders of these black beauties in the first photo. Swipe through to see what they really look like, slowly spoiled by this rather common fungal rot of ripe tomatoes. I have been carefully watching these ripen for weeks and weeks, and if they had the early signs - sunken, circular spots - I was too blissfully in love with the color and too clueless about this disease to have even known what it looked like. I now know it can infect plants by splashing up from the soil - or arrive through infected seed (never save seed from a diseased fruit). Now that it’s in my garden, it’s not going anywhere for a while, sadly. So my management strategy is to eliminate any potential spore production by removing fruit as soon as sunken spots are noticed - which I did, by luck, continue our soaker hose irrigation (no overhead watering, except for when Mother Nature waters for us), and rotate tomatoes out of this bed for at least 3 years. As soon as I identified this disease, I went out and harvested more tomatoes with sunken spots. So far, it appears my black beauty is the only tomato variety showing signs, so I am optimistic that early management will minimize spread in our garden. Be vigilant with your garden, friends, as diseases like this settle into your garden like those guest that overstays their welcome. Better yet, I truly hope you never run into this disease in your garden.
In the past years, we’ve only grown zucchini’s, tomatoes and beans starters from local nurseries. . This year, we decided to grow from seed and expanded varieties of veggies. Here’s what’s growing in the garden, bittermelon, eggplant, opalka sun gold and…
In the past years, we’ve only grown zucchini’s, tomatoes and beans starters from local nurseries. . This year, we decided to grow from seed and expanded varieties of veggies. Here’s what’s growing in the garden, bittermelon, eggplant, opalka sun gold and tomatillo tomatoes, mini okra,chayote, zucchini, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, pak choi, bok Choi , spinach, mesclun greens, carrots, green onions, cabbage, cucumbers, fennel, water spinach and strawberries. There were several seeds that didn’t germinate but will try them again next year. The moringa is growing slowly and hoping they will continue to grow. Just need to keep the rabbits away from eating the leaves. Follow us as we continue to add more veggies and flowers to our garden/farm. #organicgardening #organicveggies #growingbittermelon #growingchayote #grownbyseed #growyourownveggies #urbangardener #pinoygardener #asianveggie #moringa #firsttimeseedstarting #homesteading #veggiefarm #urbangardening #seedtotable #farmtotable #seedtofork
Whats your Friday looking like? It could look like this... ROASTED SPRING CHICKEN with creamed corn purée, upland cress, applewood bacon, and cracked honey mustard. Book your table now (link in bio).⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ #miltons #chefderekdollar #springchicken #summermenu…
We’ve all got a bad case of the Sungolds over here. Symptoms include being unimpressed by any other homegrown cherry tomato and asking your coworker to message your wife that it was the best tomato she’s ever eaten. It’s a bell that cannot be unrung, and…
We’ve all got a bad case of the Sungolds over here. Symptoms include being unimpressed by any other homegrown cherry tomato and asking your coworker to message your wife that it was the best tomato she’s ever eaten. It’s a bell that cannot be unrung, and I wouldn’t want to unring it anyway. The sweetness of this tangerine orb is beyond words, it is a dream flavor profile that never disappoints. We first tried them about 8 years ago at our local farmers market; I think our friends @waxwingfarmmn were the ones to make the introduction, so thanks you guys! I would like to have a chat with Sungold’s parents, being a hybrid tomato, and say a big thank you for all that good work they did in creating this magnificent summer masterpiece. If you haven’t eaten one, consider yourself forewarned. We are growing four types of cherry tomatoes this year, and when compared to Sungold, my Blue berries cherry tomatoes are watery and a bit sour and if I’m being completely honest won’t be grown again next year; they are more looks than flavor, which has a place in some gardens, I realize, but not here. Our sweet millions are definitely sweet but I’ve been picking them a bit too early, so working on giving them an extra few days of hang time before harvesting. And the Gold berries cherry tomatoes have enough zip and tang that I’m leaning toward keeping them in the lineup next year, though I’m open to suggestions for yellow or pink cherry tomato varieties. Do you have a cherry tomato that stands up to the small but mighty Sungold?
Good morning! Wish you have a wonderfull papaya today.
.
.
#farm
#fincamerantau
#colombia
#naturalfarm
#finca
#papaya 
#fruit
#tropicalfruit
#seedtotable
#seedtofork
#growyourownfood